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  • The Job-Search Resources Students Use, Find Most Useful

    October 10, 2018 | By NACE Staff

    Student Attitudes
    College students use online job-search resources.

    TAGS: technology, surveys, spotlight, career development, students

    Spotlight for Career Services Professionals
    Spotlight for Recruiting Professionals

    When it comes to the key resources college students report using while looking for jobs and internships, they not only use employer websites most, but find them the most useful as well.

    Among respondents to NACE’s 2018 Student Survey, 77.4 percent of those seeking a full-time job reported using employer websites. Furthermore, more than half of those using websites found them to be a “very” to “extremely” useful resource. (See Figure 1.)

    Students seeking a full-time job also considered personal confidantes—such as friends (69.0 percent use; 36.7 percent find “very” to “extremely” useful) and family (59.3 percent use; 31.7 percent find “very” to “extremely” useful)—the second and third most used and useful resources, respectively. Career/job fairs, faculty members, and the career center were all used by approximately half of these students; about one-quarter to one-fifth found these resources useful.

    Among students searching for internship/co-op positions, the results are similar, with employer websites topping the list in terms of use (71 percent) and usefulness (41.3 percent). (See Figure 2.) In addition, the percentages who reported using friends, family, career/job fairs, faculty, and the career center were nearly identical to those reported by students seeking full-time employment. This was also the case in terms of usefulness ratings—they aligned across the two groups. 

    Differences among the two groups were slight, e.g., students seeking full-time jobs saw ads as more useful than their internship/co-op-seeking counterparts did, while the latter group gave employer representatives on campus and employment recruitment brochures higher marks.

    The 2018 Student Survey Report details the attitudes, behaviors, and outcomes for bachelor’s degree students at all class levels. (Note: Previous reports provided data only on graduating seniors.) The focus of this report is the 22,109 bachelor’s degree students from the 2017-18 academic school year (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Breakdowns by class level are as follows: 4,336 freshmen, 4,174 sophomores, 5,709 juniors, and 7,890 graduating seniors. Data collection took place from February 14, 2018, to April 30, 2018. The 2018 Student Survey Report will be released this fall.

    Figure 1: Percent of students seeking a full-time position who used and rated resources “very” to “extremely” useful

    Resource Used in Job Search Considered Useful
    Employer websites 77.4% 50.3%
    Friends 69.0% 36.7%
    Parents and/or relatives 59.3% 31.7%
    Career/job fairs 54.6% 26.2%
    Faculty members 48.0% 26.5%
    Career center 47.4% 21.6%
    Ads in job-search/recruitment publications/magazines 40.8% 17.3%
    Employer information presentations on campus 40.3% 19.8%
    Employer representatives on campus 36.9% 19.7%
    Alumni 32.9% 14.9%
    Trade/professional associations 32.1% 16.6%
    Employer recruitment brochures (print) 30.3% 13.3%
    Articles in newspapers/magazines 22.4% 7.4%
    Virtual career fairs 19.8% 9.0%
    Source: 2018 Student Survey Report, National Association of Colleges and Employers

    Figure 2: Percent of students seeking an internship/co-op position who used and rated resources “very” to “extremely” useful

    Resource Used in Job Search Considered Useful
    Employer websites 71.0% 41.3%
    Friends 64.8% 33.8%
    Parents and/or relatives 57.5% 31.3%
    Career/job fairs 55.9% 26.9%
    Career center 52.2% 24.6%
    Faculty members 51.7% 29.7%
    Employer information presentations on campus 43.9% 21.8%
    Employer representatives on campus 40.6% 21.0%
    Ads in job-search/recruitment publications/magazines 38.5% 13.9%
    Employer recruitment brochures (print) 33.5% 14.1%
    Alumni 31.6% 15.3%
    Trade/professional associations 27.8% 14.5%
    Articles in newspapers/magazines 22.2% 6.7%
    Virtual career fairs 19.1% 8.9%
    Source: 2018 Student Survey Report, National Association of Colleges and Employers