• Operations - Career Services


  • A Career Services Fundraising Model Built on Strong Relationships

     

    In 2011, the University of Florida career resource center started shifting its fundraising focus and efforts to establishing relationships with employer and campus partners, creating value, and strengthening these bonds.


     

    Mentoring Guide for Career Services Professionals

     

    The Mentoring Guide for Career Services, by Gary Alan Miller, can help career services professionals onboard and mentor professionals new to the office.

     

    OP-ED In the Best Interest of Our Students: A Look at Recruiting Timelines

     

    Recruiting timelines are shifting, but students still need time to consider their options. Yale’s Jeanine Dames offers an answer that can work for students and employers alike.


     

    Career Center Physical Attributes: Square Footage, Number of Interview Rooms

     
    When it comes to measuring the physical attributes of career centers—square footage of the office, the number of rooms used for interviewing, and the number of rooms used exclusively for interviewing—it’s clear that there is nothing “typical” about these offices, according to NACE’s 2015-16 Career Services Benchmark Survey.
     

    Career Services Offices: Office Structure and Organizational Division

     
    The majority of career services operations continue to be centralized, and are most frequently housed in student affairs and academic affairs, according to NACE’s 2015-16 Career Services Benchmark Survey. However, there are noticeable shifts in these structures and alignments.
     

    Creating a Culture of Diversity and Inclusion: Start With Small Wins

     
    When creating a culture of diversity and inclusion in career services, Shelagh Saenz of the University of Michigan School of Public Health recommends taking small actionable steps to build momentum, increase your center’s reputation, and gain allies.
     

    Career Readiness Meets Institution-Wide Outcomes Measures

     

    This is the time to marry two potent forces in higher education—college to career readiness and systematic focus on shared institutional outcomes. Career services has much to offer as the whole campus aligns to assure that students graduate with experiences and credentials that reflect genuine capacities that will serve them well in securing work with solid prospects and lives of meaning and agency.


     

    Career Development Models for the 21st Century

     

    A career development model helps us to better answer the question of how people come to select or acquire a career. Four models—narrative theory, career construction and life design theory, chaos theory, and planned happenstance and happenstance learning theory—are among those models that address 21st century issues. 


     

    Implementing a New Career Development Theory: A Case Study

     

    The authors discuss the steps to selecting and implementing a new career development model. In this case, the new model was the Chaos Theory of Careers (CTC). This article is the companion to “Career Development Models for the 21st Century.”


     

    Into the Future: A 21st Century Career Services Framework Part 1: Strategic Partnerships

     

    There is no one model for the ideal career center, as the broad diversity of institutions makes it impossible to apply one that will work for all. NACE’s 21st Century Career Services Model Team identified three themes that provide a framework for the successful 21st century career center. Part 1 addresses the strategic partnerships theme.


     

    Into the Future: A 21st Century Career Services Framework Part 2: Student Engagement

     

    There is no one model for the ideal career center, as the broad diversity of institutions makes it impossible to apply one that will work for all. NACE’s 21st Century Career Services Model Team identified three themes that provide a framework for the successful 21st century career center. Part 2 addresses the student engagement theme.


     

    Into the Future: A 21st Century Career Services Framework Part 3: Talent Development

     

    There is no one model for the ideal career center, as the broad diversity of institutions makes it impossible to apply one that will work for all. NACE’s 21st Century Career Services Model Team identified three themes that provide a framework for the successful 21st century career center. Part 3 addresses the talent development theme.


     

    Career Center Staff Salaries Then and Now: 2005 and 2015

     
    Among career center professional staff, directors earned the highest annual base salary, followed by associate directors, according to NACE’s 2015-16 Career Services Benchmark Survey Report for Colleges and Universities. But, how have the salaries of career center professional staff members changed over the last 10 years, particularly from the perspective of inflation?
     

    The Future of Career Services Is Now

     
    The current drive to better understand and anticipate the future of career services may be distinctive in that it is influenced by certain environmental factors that threaten a potential sea change in higher education.
     

    Vetting, Education Keys to Preventing Burn From Fraudulent Job Postings

     
    How are career centers protecting their students—and the career centers, themselves—from unscrupulous scammers and the fraudulent job postings they often deploy to gain access to students?
     

    Career Center Services and Fees for Students, Alumni, and Employers

     
    Most career centers did not charge students and alumni to register with the center or for general services, according to NACE’s 2014-15 Career Services Benchmark Survey.
     

    Career Services Benchmarks: Staff Salaries and Experience

     
    Average salaries for eight of nine career center staff positions climbed in 2014-15 from last year.
     

    New Benchmarks: Physical Attributes of the Career Center

     
    How big is the typical career center? Results of NACE’s 2014-15 Career Services Benchmark Survey show career centers have an average of 2,573 square feet. However, when data are viewed by Carnegie Classification, it’s clear that there is no typical career center in terms of size.
     

    How to “Embed” Career Services Into Academic Affairs

     
    Placing internship and co-op professionals in academic departments can give career services a leg up on promoting experiential education to faculty and students.
     

    Developing the Industry-Centric Career Cluster Model

     
    Rutgers University career Services staff implemented an industry-centric and tailored career interest cluster approach to service delivery on counseling, programming, academic engagement, employer development, assessment, technology.
     

    The University Commitment to Career Services

     
    Given the increased attention to career outcomes from both government and university administrations, one would expect a significant commitment on the part of the university to the career services office. This commitment could be measured in terms of critical resources expressed as either added dollars or increased personnel to handle the increasing difficulty of counseling students to succeed in a depressed job market. Using data from two installments of NACE’s annual Career Services Benchmark Survey for Colleges and Universities (2007 and 2014), this article examines the strength of that commitment.
     

    What’s a Name Worth? Career Center Directors, Operations, and Salaries

     
    It has been speculated that the title of a college career center’s top professional position may have an effect on its staffing size and operating budget. This article addresses this question by exploring data from NACE’s 2013-14 Career Services Benchmark Survey.
     

    Strategies for Better Facilitating the Recruitment of Students With Disabilities

     
    New regulations from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) require federal contractors to set a target of having 7 percent of their work force be comprised of employees with disabilities.
     

    How Others Do It: Career Cluster Model Allows for Specialization, Customization

     
    New Brunswick implemented a cluster model to move from a major-centric focus on programming and delivery to one that is more industry-centric.
     

    Innovating in Times of Change

     
    As engaged professionals, we must be intentional and proactive in our efforts to best serve our stakeholders and avoid simply reacting to our environment. So, how, in the career services field, are we providing the innovations needed to keep up with and even get ahead of the changing times?