• What Students Want From Employers

    Spotlight for Recruiting Professionals
    October 24, 2012
     

    How can your organization promote its image as a “great” place to work? What types of experiences and benefits are students seeking?

    The following elements and practices, based on responses to NACE’s 2012 Student Survey, offer ways you can boost your recruiting according to the preferences of the college students your organization is recruiting:

    • Let students hear from youYour messaging needs to go well beyond standard advertising, whether through traditional media or the more contemporary online approaches. Graduates from the Class of 2012 indicated that messaging through these branding channels was both little used and generally ineffective when it came to the student’s gathering any knowledge about a potential employer. Instead, students want to hear directly from your organization either through its website or from representatives of your organization that the student meets on campus.
    • Involve key sources to carry your message—In addition to direct communication, your branding messages work best if they are reinforced by trusted advisers to the student, such as parents, faculty, and career services staff. This year’s graduates tended to use and rely upon personal university sources for information about employers more than previous classes.
    • Incorporate elements critical to intern conversion—Your internships need to be structured properly before they become advantageous avenues for recruiting students. Two attributes of the internship experience stood out as critical toward enticing a student to accept a full-time offer: getting paid during the internship and being engaged in project-level analytical work while not spending a lot of time on administrative and clerical tasks.
    • Offer the benefits important to your recruits—While the importance of a high starting salary has diminished over the past couple of classes, the attention students are paying to the benefits packages offered by employers remains high. This year’s graduates are very concerned about employers contributing to new graduate recruits’ continued training and education. They’re also seeking decent insurance packages and greater vacation time.

    NACE’s 2012 Student Survey was conducted mid-January through April 30, 2012. Nearly 48,000 college students nationwide, including 15,715 seniors at the bachelor’s degree level, took part in the survey. A report based on survey results from graduating seniors will be available later this fall.


What Students Want From Employers